Tuesday, May 24, 2016

RULER TUTORIAL FOR MINIATURISTS

I might be a bit audacious thinking I might be able to explain our USA rulers to people but I thought I would try.  I have had questions about putting measurements into centimeters.  I did do that for a while but I got lazy and stopped, probably lost some followers on that.  So, here goes . . . 









Pictured above is a representation of 1 inch that has been divided into two equal parts.  We refer to these equal parts as fractions.  The picture above is showing the inch divided in half or 1/2 inch.  Each part is a 1/2 inch.  There are two 1/2 inches in every one inch.

1/2 inch plus 1/2 inch equal 1 whole inch







Pictured above is a representation of 1 inch that has been divided into 4 equal parts.  Each part is a quarter inch or 1/4 inch.  There are four 1/4 inches in 1 inch.

1/4 inch plus 1/4 inch equals 1/2 inch

1/4 inch plus 1/4 inch plus 1/4 inch equals 3/4 inches

See picture below showing 3/4 inch

1/4 inch plus 1/4 inch plus 1/4 inch plus 1/4 inch equals 1 inch









Pictured above is a representation of an inch divided into 8 equal parts.  Each part is an eighth inch or 1/8 inch.  There are eight 1/8 inches in 1 inch.

1/8 inch plus 1/8 inch equals 1/4 inch

1/8 inch plus 1/8 inch plus 1/8 inch equals 3/8 inch

1/8 inch plus 1/8 inch plus 1/8 inch plus 1/8 inch equals 1/2 inch

1/8 inch plus 1/8 inch plus 1/8 inch plus 1/8 inch plus 1/8 inch equals 5/8 inch

1/8 inch plus 1/8 inch plus 1/8 inch plus 1/8 inch plus 1/8 inch plus 1/8 inch equals 3/4 inch

1/8 inch plus 1/8 inch plus 1/8 inch plus 1/8 inch plus 1/8 inch plus 1/8 inch plus 1/8 inch equals 7/8 inch

1/8 inch plus 1/8 inch plus 1/8 inch plus 1/8 inch plus 1/8 inch plus 1/8 inch plus 1/8 inch plus 1/8 inch equals 1 inch

This picture above is showing the 1/8 inches added and written on the ruler.








The picture above is a representation of an inch that is divided into 16 equal parts or 1/16 inch.  Each part is a sixteenth or 1/16 inch.  There are sixteen 1/16 inches in 1 inch.

I could write out all of the addition as I did above but think you might have the idea.

I have the 1/16 inch marks added up on the ruler for you.











Above is a representation of  2 inches.


Let's find 1 and 3/16 inches.

Find 1 inch.  Count three 1/16 inch marks.

I have 1 inch marked with an X and I've counted 1,2 and 3 more 1/16 inch marks.  The arrow is pointing to 1 and 3/16 inches, total.






Let's do 1 and 3/8 inches.

Find the 1 inch, then count over three 1/8 inch marks.



I have the 1 inch marked with and X and I counted 1,2 and 3 more 1/8 inch marks.  The arrow is pointing to 1 and 3/8 inches, total.



O.K. I would do more but Digger is sitting on top of the printer looking out of the window so I can't put anymore examples into the printer to show you.

Let me know if this works for you or if you need more explanation.  I would also think a better explanation would be available on Google.

Dasha, let me know if this helps, Kris

12 comments:

  1. A good grasp of fractions is vital for mini making imho. I make a lot of furniture from scratch and I rely on being able to manipulate fractions all the time. Because of the historical 1:12 scale working in centimetres just does not work. Thanks for your excellent helpful tuition as always.

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  2. Thank you for this. I have seen some directions for mini furnitures in cm and I'm not very good at determining what to do! Thank you.
    Be a sweetie,
    Shelia ;)

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  3. thank you Kris! I always take the calculator route -I divide then multiply every measurement so that I can end up with centimeters. I.e. for 1/8 inch, I divide 2,54 (that is an inch converted in centimeters) by 8. 3/16, I divide 2,54 by 16 then multiply the result by 3. And so on. It is a but clumsy, but it's the only way around it that works for me. Maybe this can help someone else too :)

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  4. sorry about that, I mean 2.54 (that was the comma used the European way :)

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  5. Que interesante, a mi me lian montón las dichosas pulgadas, jeje, pero imagino que es acostumbrarse :P, tu tutorial es muy útil, muchas gracias :D
    Besote!!!!!

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  6. We have rulers here with cm one one side and inches on the other side. Good metal rulers too, for cutting. I even found tailor's tape with both types of units. I think looking at a ruler is the easiest way to convert for miniatures.

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  7. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  8. I work in centimeters so this was a helpful lesson. But can someone tell me what 2/3 inch is. This is used to describe 1:18 scale

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  9. Thank's for the tutorial Kris!! XOXO

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  10. I've taken a screen grab and i'm gonna use this once printed - I was having a right old time trying to figure out what 2 15/16 was - even tried googling it and it didn't help (I'm from the UK so we either did CM or points ie 1.3" or 1.9")

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    ReplyDelete